Post A Day · Self Reflection · Uncategorized

Trichotillomania – Really hard to deal with…

The story of T is not only a story. It’s not because my name is Thelma and begins with a “T” but far more than others know about me. This is my open book, not always pretty, not always happy – but true.

Living with Trichotillomania (Hair pulling disorder) has been difficult. Not many know that I deal with it daily. To some it’s not that “important” but it’s taking a toll on me. I believe it started when I was around 13 or 14 years old that I felt the need to pull that first string of hair from my head and to this day – I CAN’T STOP!

It is a constant battle to sit and try to have a good time without having to constantly have my hand direct itself to my head and pull and pull and pull some more. Now at 34, I have realized that I need help or I will end up bald. I am actually VERY surprised that I do not have any bald spots yet.

There’s so much stress, anxiety and depression in me that it obviously doesn’t help when I feel alone.

After talking to my doctor who offered a referral, I didn’t go scared that I would be put on medication to make it stop. Then the real anxiety came just thinking if something is wrong with my brain… I just can’t stop.

So today again, I decided to reach out to my doctor for help. There’s other events going on in my life right now that are making it worse. Do I need help? Yes!

My type of Trich is described as:

  • Focused. Some people pull their hair intentionally to relieve tension or distress — for example, pulling hair out to get relief from the overwhelming urge to pull hair. Some people may develop elaborate rituals for pulling hair, such as finding just the right hair or biting pulled hairs.

I am so tired of feeling worthless, feeling depressed, feeling lonely. 

So getting self-help is my next step to recovery from this OCD.

I wish I knew more people dealing with the same thing…

To find out more about this disorder, follow the link and read more about it. Perhaps, there’s someone you know who isn’t able to talk about it.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/trichotillomania/basics/definition/con-20030043


Next time someone sits down with you to discuss what they are going through, make sure you pay attention. It might be a cry out for help. We tend to listen to everyone else, except the ones we love.

They say you don’t need to be alone to feel lonely and that is so true.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s